The Gluten Syndrome.net.top

Patient Perspectives on Gluten Grain Sensitivities,

Gluten Grain Intolerances,  Celiac Disease,

and the risks of Gluten Challenges for Diagnostic Purposes

(Formerly GlutenSensitivity.net,  www.GlutenReactivity.net)

 

 

 

 Home Introduction History Gluten Grain Sensitivities Primer Gluten Grain Sensitivity Circle Chart  7 Viewpoints Comparison Chart Testing discussion Lab Test Charts

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More:8 crucial points

    Note: Updated Primer coming Note: Updated circle chart coming Note: Updated viewpoints chart coming

Most likely tests to find positives

 

Cyrex Labs

is now open!

www.cyrexlabs.com

Initial Adverse Reactions to GF Diet

  Services and Vendors

For the latest version of each page on this website click "refresh" on your browser tool bar.

                             Last Updated January 12, 2011                          

Gluten Syndrome Laboratory Test Panels

and

Test Panels which Target Villi Damage only (Celiac disease)

 

Panels are in alphabetical order by Laboratory or Celiac center name.

 

This website has no financial interest in any products or services mentioned here

                                     

Cyrex Labs is now open!  click here.  More info asap.  www.cyrexlabs.com

 

                                                   

                                                                                 

NOTE:  Evidence of the gluten syndrome can be hard to find.  It hides very well often!

Some researchers believe no one test panel covers all possibilities. Gluten can break down into pieces for which there are no tests at this time.  Patients who wish to "leave no known stone unturned" must be prepared to run several types of tests, methodically checking all markers, systems and mediums until they exhaust all known possibilities.  There are several known toxic gluten fractions for which no tests are available at this time.  Research on these markers.

Some researchers also believe that disturbances*** may block the markers for which these tests are looking.   They also believe the body may be too exhausted to even properly process the proteins needed to make very many antibodies. Therefore, if a negatively tested patient still suspects a gluten related reaction, the patient is wise to seriously respect his body's message.

 

Panels on this page test for various combinations of the following known markers, in the following body systems, in the following mediums:

 

                    Gluten Syndrome Antibody Markers                                                                  Body Immune Systems*                           Mediums

 

*Gliadin (a "piece" of gluten)  AGA - Anti Gliadin Antibodies                                      IgA, IgG, IgM, ALCAT                 Blood (serum), Stool, Saliva

UPDATE:

8 more forms of gliadin antibodies are now available for testing by Cyrex Labs

 

Gluten (Whole gluten molecule - rarely tested - WHY NOT!!)                                       IgA, IgG, IgM                             Blood

UPDATE: Gluten(in) now available by Cyrex Labs                                                        IgA, IgG                                    Blood

 

Gluteomorphin (a toxic opiate like piece of improperly digested gluten)                         IgA, IgG, IgM, ALCAT                 Blood

UPDATE:  Gluteomorphin antibody tests available by Cyrex Labs

 

tTG (tissue transglutaminase - elevation indicates gut damage)                                   IgA, IgG, IgM, ALCAT                 Blood, Stool, Saliva

 

EMA (anti endomysial antibodies - replaced by tTG)                                                    IgA, IgG,                                   Blood

 

Wheat (whole kernel, to test unknown factors)                                                           IgA, IgG                                    Blood

UPDATE:  Wheat and wheat germ antibody tests available by Cyrex Labs                      IgA, IgG                                    Blood

 

Overall Intestinal Function (fat malabsorption)                                                            Molecule size,                           Stool

Genes  - HLA DQ 2, 8 only -  reported positive/negative                                                                                              Blood or cheek swab

OR your HLA DQ type is reported

Some researchers also recognize HLA DQ 1 and 3 and others.

Some believe genes are not needed in all cases, and blame toxins, stress and infections as underlying causes due to leaky gut or breached mucosal membranes. membranes)                                                   

                   

Non Antibody markers

 

Urine tests for gluteomorphin peptides (not the antibodies to gluteomorphins, but the peptides/pieces of gluten themselves) are available from Genova Diagnostics (Urinary Polypeptides panel), and Great Plains Laboratories (Gluten and Casein Peptides)

 

Some blood test panels do not look for antibodies.  Instead they react the blood with various substances (antigens), in this case gluten related antigens and look for changes in the white cells or specific white cells called lymphocytes that may indicate an immune response.  These changes may be swelling, granulation, apoptosis, halos, etc.  These tests are controversial.  Some professionals believe they pick up foods the person eats frequently, not necessarily ones to which they have an immune response.  Some patients believe the test help them identify problem foods. 

 

* Most labs now run "deamidated gliadin" which is considered more likely to be positive if an immune response is present.                            

 

Cross reactive foods                     

Additionally, some labs test for known cross reactive foods and other potentially problematic substances, gluten grain substitutes/foods and organs/tissues most prone to gluten damage due to their similar protein structure.  Cross reactive food include

 

Milk, (casomorphins, butyrophilins) - the peptides themselves and IgA, IgG, IgM antibodies

Egg - IgA, IgG, IgM

Corn - IgA, IgG, IgM,

Soy - IgA, IgG, IgM,

Yeasts

Barley, and Rye are considered gluten grains.

Spelt, Durum wheat, Polish wheat, Kamut, Fu, are forms of wheat.

Buckwheat, Sorghum, Amaranth, Tapioca, Potato, Rice, Hemp, are considered gluten free, but may also cross react in some people.

Oats are considered gluten free if produced in a gluten free environment and marked as such. Many folks react to GF oats.

Sometimes coffee, chocolate, and sesame may also cross react.

 

Note: Quinoa, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and other non gluten grains are now suspected to be problematic for some patients**.  It may be helpful to test gluten substitutes also. Some researchers believe that if the gut is still "leaky" (meaning it allows substances to cross the gut wall before they are sufficiently broken down), the body may become reactive to more substances including gluten substitutes.

 

Tissue damage tests and biopsies

Villi focused celiac specialists use villi and skin biopsies as gold standards to diagnose an immune reaction to gluten and only then to prescribe the gluten free diet. 

 

Gluten syndrome specialists do NOT use the villi biopsy for gold standard gluten syndrome diagnosis but may utilize the endoscopy if there are other reasons to examine the gut.  Often, since they are already there, they take a biopsy to check, but ignore a negative biopsy diagnostic since the villi may be healthy but other tissues in other places may be the targets of damage instead.  To look for tissue damage in other places that are not easily biopsied, gluten syndrome specialists rely instead on organ/tissue function tests and soon predictive organ/tissue antibody tests to check for possible organ or tissue damage, coupled with gluten antibody tests. If the patient has gluten antibodies, a gluten free diet and other treatments are prescribed and the tissue antibodies are rechecked later for possible improvement.

 

Here are common tissue antibody tests that indicate organ damage is ongoing.

 

Brain and nervous system - Myelin basic protein (MBP), cerebellar tissue and neurofilaments - IgA, IgG, IgM

Thyroid - Thyroid peroxidase, Thyroglobulin - IgA, IgG, IgM 

Pancreas - Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase  - IgA, IgG, IgM

Stomach - Parietal cells (B 12 function) - IgA, IgG, IgM

Heat Shock Proteins

DPP IV - Digestive enzyme that breaks down gluten and milk

 

Gene tests

 

The "celiac only" perspective on genes

According to most researchers, gene tests are not proof that the immune system presently reacts.  They do indicate a predisposition for gluten reaction.  Celiac focused specialists recognize HLA DQ 2, and 8 for celiac predisposition.  Other genes in other locations are under investigation. 

 

The most complete gene tests are run in 2 parts. 

 

Most celiac focused gene tests do not report the patient's actual HLA DQ genes.  They only report positive or negative for HLA DQ 2 or 8.  If they are positive some labs will provide the specific 2 or 8 gene subtype upon request.  These tests can run from $400 - $500 and may be much higher if they are ordered through a hospital or celiac center.

 

The "gluten syndrome" perspective on genes

Dr. Ken Fine, MD, Enterolab, Dallas, Tx, recognizes HLA DQ 1, 2, 3, and 8 as gluten syndrome associated genes. He states that HLA DQ 4 is the only HLA gene that does not appear to be related to gluten reaction. According to Dr. Fine this translates to about 83% of the Caucasian population as gluten syndrome gene carriers.  https://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Faq_Result_Interpretation.htm

 

Enterolab reports the actual HLA DQ genes the patient possesses, not just positive or negative for HLA DQ 2 or 8.  Enterolab only runs a 1 part gene test , not the second part for certain few DQ 2 subtypes.  Why? Here is an explanation.  This gluten syndrome related gene test is $169.

 

Dr. Fine believes that if gluten is presented to the immune system, meaning if it slips, improperly digested, beyond a mucosal barrier such as the gut wall, the immune system will always react if a gluten syndrome gene is present.

 

Dr. Fine's work is highly respected for it's clinical accuracy, but to date is unpublished.  (Jan, 2011)

  

Dr. Aristo Vojdani, Los Angeles, CA, does not believe a gene is necessary for immune response to gluten, but if it is present it does predispose.  He believes TOXINS, in particular, (and stress and infections) are sufficient to trigger immune response without a gluten related gene.  He  considered HLA DQ 2 and 8 only when he came to this conclusion.

 

 

Additional factors and comments

 

The more markers tested in the most places in the body, in the most mediums, the higher the chance of finding evidence somewhere in the body of an adverse reaction to gluten. There is no guaranteed order of testing priority.

 

Patients who test extensively and become convinced that they are not gluten reactive may develop gluten reactivity in the future, often triggered by stressors, toxins, or infections.  According to some researchers, genes are not needed but can predispose to adverse reaction.** 

 

Some patients go gluten free simply because they believe gluten is not good for anyone due to changes in gluten grains and other health issues today.  Without test confirmation, it is more difficult to establish and maintain a lifelong strict gluten free diet.  

 

Some patients will not find confirmation with the incomplete tests available today.

 

FYI !!  Seesawing on and off a gluten free diet may trigger painful and/or atypical reactions in some people, including neurological symptoms.

           For a few patients, going gluten free may trigger a temporary withdrawal reaction, similar to a drug withdrawal, with a variety of symptoms. 

 

The hypersensitive immune system

Some professionals believe the immune system may still be too hypersensitive (runs in "high gear") even on the gluten free diet.  They believe it needs to be "shifted back into neutral" to avoid continued overreaction and autoimmune damage.  Many doctors believe this may involve other lifestyle changes beside going gluten free.  Many patients also choose to reduce or avoid toxins, sugars, grains in general, processed fats and food, electromagnetic radiations.  They switch to more nutrient dense organic, pastured animal foods and sometimes some raw foods, and simplify their lives to avoid stress.

 

For a specific protocol to intended to calm down the immune system, see www.thedr.com

 

    * IgA, IgG, IgM are different parts of the immune system

       ALCAT tests the white blood cell reaction to various substances.  It is not an antibody test. 

       ELISA ACT panels test the B cells within which the antibodies are made.  This is not an antibody test.

  ** Dr. Aristo Vojdani PhD, MT, Immunosciences Laboratories, (researcher)

*** Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, PhD  Disturbances may include emotions and body electric issues in some investigators opinions

 

NOTE:  COMING SOON           NEWS  Cyrex Labs is now open January 11. 2011  www.cyrexlabs.com  More info here asap.

 

Cyrex labs now offers detailed antibody panels for gluten, gluteomorphins, and many other gluten related antibodies, cross reactive foods and intestinal permeability in saliva and blood. 

 

If these extensive tests still produce a suspicious negative, a stool test (very sensitive for gliadin and tTG) from www.enterolab.com is a separate option to check, OR the patient may react to antibodies for which no tests are currently developed.  Note: the Enterolab stool test is the only test available that is useful for someone who has been on a gluten free diet for months.  Call the lab to find out how long GF is too long to use the stool test.  www.enterolab.com

 

For such extreme negative testing patients, an elimination diet may give them information.  How long is long enough?  There is no final answer.  This is not an easy situation,  but  likely  rare.  However, if there is no definite reaction to removing gluten, challenging an elimination diet with gluten should be done carefully under a knowledgeable doctor's care, and discontinued if there is a reaction.  In these cases it is important to remember silent syndrome dynamics that may  silence nerves and mask improvement or further damage upon challenge.

 

In a high percentage of cases when patients are tested for additional antibodies in more mediums such as stool, blood and saliva, many more of of them obtain positive results. (ex., in one practice, 77% of patients tested positive to a  detailed panel of gluten related antibodies similar to the extensive panel now offered by Cyrex Labs.)

 

 

Google



Web Search Site Search

 

                                                                                          

 

Click to go directly to a specific lab

ALCAT Worldwide Cell Science Systems

Chicago - University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program

Columbia - Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University

Cyrex Labs

Direct Lab Services

Enterolab

Genova Diagnostics - formerly Great Smokies Laboratories

 

 

 

Immco Diagnostics

Immunosciences Laboratories - see Cyrex Labs

Kimball Genetics

Mayo Clinic

Maryland - University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

Optimum Health Resources Labs - (formerly York Allergy Labs)

Prometheus Laboratories

 

This is the only gluten related blood test option
for patients who have been gluten free for a very long time.

ALCAT Worldwide  Cell Science Systems

www.alcat.com     email: info@alcat.com

1239 East Newport Center Drive, Suite 101

Deerfield Beach, FL  33442

Phone: (800) US AL CAT (872-5228)   (954) 426 - 2304   Fax: (954)428-8676

The ALCAT test is a separate type of test compared to the antibody panels featured on this page.  This test does not check antibodies. In this method, white blood cells are exposed to various foods and  substances and the reaction of the white blood cells, such as swelling, granulation, etc., is observed.  Adverse white blood cell reactions may occur for many reasons.  The test process does not indicate why the response occurs or if it is autoimmune. It is only believed by some to indicate that there is an adverse reaction.  It does NOT rule out other types of reactions such as antibody formation or processes science has not yet discovered.  For more information see  www.alcat.com

This test is controversial.  Many professionals believe it is not scientifically reliable and will simply show positive for foods eaten frequently.  Many patients claim the results help them pinpoint problem foods but not necessarily gage the severity of the reaction.

Here is a simple analogy to explain the difference between the ALCAT test and traditional blood or stool tests for IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies. To look for antibodies in the IgA, IgG or IgM systems  is similar to calling in the Army, Navy and Air Force to find a criminal. (See "Stories to Help Us Understand" on the "Testing" page).  The ALCAT method is likened to calling in the National Guard.  It's claimed to be another place to look for proof of adverse response.  As with antibody tests, a positive ALCAT test is thought to be proof of a problem, but a negative test does NOT guarantee the substance is safe since OTHER BODY SYSTEMS MAY REACT.

 

Panels  range from 50 items tested to over 200.  Prices range from $87.50 - $999

 

This lab includes gliadin ( a part of wheat gluten) and gluten tests in their panels.  They also test separately for barley, rye and other grains.  Doctor prescription is not mandatory and arrangements are available for a mobile nurse/phlebotomist to perform the blood draw at home.  Post test counseling is included in the test package.  This is the only blood test available for patients who have been strictly gluten free for a very long time.

     

 

Chicago, University of - The  University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program

Founder/Medical Director - Dr. Stefano Guandalini  

Program Director - Carol McCarthy Shilson

5839 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 4069, Room C-491

Chicago, IL 60637

Phone - 773-702-7593       Website www.celiacdisease.net

UniversityiofiChicago  CeliaciDiseasei

Program's Recommended TestsiSpecificallyifor

CeliaciDiseasei

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:iBlood

IgA   x     x   x        
IgD                      
IgE                      
IgG                      
IgM                      
TotalIIgA                      
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8               x      
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                 

 

     
IntestinaliBiopsyi(villi)                      
IntestinaliMalabsorption                      
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                     x
Colitisttest((GSipanelialso recommended)                      

      

This panel focuses on celiac villi damage only.

 

     Celiac Disease Screener tTG-IgA (specific to villi damage)     Gene test      Additional options EMA -IgA,  and/or Total IgA

 

This is a panel recommended by University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program.  This is not a commercial lab.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

      

                                  

 

 

Columbia, University of - Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University

Dr. Peter H. R. Green MD - Director

For general education and information contact Hal Winfield    Phone 212-342-0251

Website - www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu

CeliaciDiseaseiCenter atiUniversityiof Columbia

recommendediceliac

panel

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:i

IgA x x     x          
IgD                    
IgE                    
IgG x                  
IgM                    
TotalIIgA             x      
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8               x    
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                       
IntestinaliBiopsyi(villi)                 x  
IntestinaliMalabsorption                    
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                   x
Colitisttest((GSipanelialso recommended)                    

     

This is a short non comprehensive antibody panel.

 

                             Celiac Disease Panel              Gene test                Intestinal duodenal biopsy             Skin Biopsy

 

This panel is recommended by the Columbia Celiac Disease Center.  This is not a commercial lab

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

Can't get a doctor to listen or prescribe testing? 

This lab provides direct testing services through local Patient Service Centers. 

An on staff DLS physician provides the script. 

These are not comprehensive panels.

Direct Lab Services

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 601
Mandeville, LA 70470-0601

Direct Lab Services offers 3 gluten related panels without a prescription from the patient's doctor. 

A staff physician provides the script.  The specimen is drawn at a local LabCorp location. 

Celiac panels are found under the "testing" link in the alphabetical list

 

Celiac Disease Ab Profile    Price: $192

                            Celiac Disease AB Comprehensive Profile    Price: $220

~~~~

Immuno Labs tests available through Direct Lab Services are found under the Tests > Specialty Labs > Immuno Labs link on the Direct Labs website

                                           Immuno Labs AGA - IgA, IgG          Price: $152  Includes Comprehensive Metabolic Profile*

                                                     Immuno Labs tTG - IgA          Price: $149

                                          A milk and egg antibody profile       Price: $179  Includes Comprehensive Metabolic Profile*

* This is a free test that is offered when other tests are ordered. - Comprehensive Metabolic Profile -14  includes liver, kidney, glucose, and electrolytes.  The CMP is a frequently ordered group of 14 laboratory tests that gives important information about the current status of your kidneys, liver and electrolyte and acid/base balance as well as your blood sugar and blood proteins.  Abnormal results, and especially combinations of abnormal results, can indicate a problem that needs to be addressed.  Glucose (diabetes testing Kidney(renal panel) Liver panel (Hepatic) Electrolytes (*fasting required)

You must first order through DIRECT LABS and receive the necessary requisition prior to visiting a Patient Service Center (PSC). The PSC will not draw your blood without the DLS paperwork and/or you could get billed the much-higher "Patient Price" without it. 

These are short non comprehensive antibody panels.

      

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

         Enterolab -  Director, Dr. Kenneth Fine 

 

10875 Plano Rd.  Suite 123, Dallas , Texas 75238 

 

Phone 972 -686-6869

 

Website: www.enterolab.com        Email: info@intestinalhealth.org

 

 

Enterolab

Mediumttested: Stooli(homeitest)

Genettest: Cheekiswabi(homeitest)

IgA x       x         x x x      
IgD                              
IgE                              
IgG                              
IgM                              
TotalIIgA                              
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                              
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                 

x

             
IntestinaliMalabsorption                           x  
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                              

                              

This is a home stool test.

 

This is not a comprehensive antibody panel.

However, due to it's high sensitivity for gliadin and tTG, and its' intestinal function test it finds antibodies much more often than typical celiac panels.

 

No dr. script required.

 

              Gluten Sensitivity Panel (GS) $249         Gene test alone $149       Egg, Soy and Yeast test $199

        Gluten Sensitivity Panel with Milk and Gene test $369     Colitis test $49 (GS Panel also recommended)   

   Test kits available at www.enterolab.com    This is a home test.  Results emailed to patient.  Email support available.

 

This stool panel is part of ongoing announced but unpublished research, is claimed to be more sensitive than blood, and includes an intestinal function test.

Even though this test panel checks only 2 of many possible antibodies, it  has a MUCH higher positivity rate than identical "celiac only" blood tests.

The sensitivity of this test is presumed to be due to earlier presence of antibodies in stool versus blood. 

  However, since only 2 of many possible gluten related antibodies are checked, a negative test result does not rule out the presence of other possible gluten related antibodies or necessarily indicate that the patient can safely consume gluten.  In other words, a positive is conclusive of an immune reaction, a negative is inconclusive. 

 

Intestinal villi biopsy is not recommended by this lab unless there are other reasons to examine the digestive tract and duodenum.  These researchers believe damage may occur in many places in the body including but not limited to the villi, and this invalidates villi biopsy as a diagnostic gold standard.

 

This test is controversial, but patient and even overall professional confidence appears to have risen significantly over the past 8 years, despite lack of formal validation.  Many many patients find the test results match their experience.

 

See www.enterolab.com for essays which explain this research project.

 

* The gene test is a 1 part test meaning it is not as detailed for a few patients for the HLA DQ 2 gene.  See this page (bottom) for explanation.

The specific HLA DQ alleles of the patient are reported whether or not the patient possesses a gluten syndrome gene.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

           

 

Genova Diagnostics  (formerly Great Smokies Laboratories)

63 Zillicoa St.

Asheville, NC, 28801

Telephone: (800)522-4762    Fax: (828)252-9303

www.genovadiagnostics.com

8 am - 6:30 pm EST, Monday  - Friday, 

Great Smokies Laboratories

Mediumsttested: Varies

Genettest:i

IgA x x       x      
IgD                  
IgE                  
IgG x         x      
IgM                  
       

x

         
TotalIIgA               x  
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                  
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                     

          

This lab offers gluteomorphin and casomorphin testing in addition to tTG/gliadin antibodies.

 

                                                      Urinary Polypeptides panel - Gliadomorphins or Gliadorphins, (another term for gluteomorphins)

                                                                                                                            Casomorphins 

                                                                                                                            Support guide here

 

 

  Celiac Profile - Tissue Transglutaminase IgA and IgG,

                  Adrenocortex Stress Profile 

                 Acetaminophen derivatives

                                                                                                                 Total IgA

                                                                When IgA-tTG is positive, testing for IgA-Anti-endomysial Antibodies (IgA-EMA) is routinely performed.

 

          Clinicians also have the option of testing two additional analytes;
- IgA Anti-gliadin Antibodies (IgA-AGA)
- IgG Anti-gliadin antibodies (IgG-AGA)
These antibodies can be performed as part of the initial diagnostic evaluation, or on their own to monitor compliance to a gluten free diet.

 

Dr. script required.  See physician for pricing

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

 

The Great Plains Laboratory, Inc.

11813 West 77th Street
Lenexa, KS 66214 USA

Director:  Dr. William Shaw Ph.D.  Board certified Chemistry and Toxicology

Phone:  1-800-288-0383   Local:  1-913-341-8949  Fax:  1-913-341-6207

www.greatplainslaboratory.com     email: customerservice@GPL4U.com

Informacion en Espanol:  sfeliciano@GPL4U.com 

Check website for customer service in other languages.

 

Great Smokies Laboratories

Mediumsttested: Varies

Genettest:i

IgA x x       x      
IgD                  
IgE                  
IgG x         x      
IgM                  
       

x

         
TotalIIgA               x  
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                  
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                     

          

This lab offers gluteomorphin and casomorphin testing.

 

                                            Gluten/Casein Peptides Test - Gliadomorphins or Gliadorphins, (another term for gluteomorphins)

                                                                                                                        Casomorphins  (milk peptides similar to gluteomorphins)

                                                                                                                        Explanatory brochure here

                                                                                                           Price:   $110.00

 

 

Dr. script required.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

Immco Diagnostics, Inc.

Vijay Kumar, PH.D. - President and CEO

60 Pineview Drive, Buffalo, NY 14228 USA

USA Phone:  800-537-8378  International phone:  716-691-0091  Fax: 716-691-0046

Website:  www.immco.net      email:  info@immco.net

Immcoi

Diagnostics

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:iBlood

IgA   x x     x      
IgD                  
IgE                  
IgG   x       x      
IgM                  
TotalIIgA                  
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                 x
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                     

     

This is a short, non comprehensive antibody panel.

 

                        Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy (Celiac Disease) Panel - $275        Gene test only - $350          Dr. script required

                                              

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

 

 

Cyrex Labs

Cyrex Labs now offers comprehensive gluten syndrome testing

formerly performed by Immunosciences Laboratories.

Immunosciences Laboratories is currently a specialty retail and research lab.

~~

Medical Director - Dr. Dhiren Joshipura, M.D.

Chief Scientific Advisor  -  Dr. Aristo Vojdani, Ph.D.,   M.Sc.,   C.L.S. of Immunosciences Laboratories

Clinical Advisor Functional Medicine - Dr. Thomas O’Bryan, D.C., C.C.N., D.A.C.B.N.  www.thedr.com

 

Video clips of Dr. Vojdani

  Part 1  Quicktime Dialup, DSL   Windows Media Dialup, DSL

   Part 2  Quicktime Dialup, DSL   Windows Media, Dialup, DSL

 

                                                    

 

5040 N. 15th Ave.  Suite 107

Phoenix, AZ, 85015

 

Questions?  email here

Phone:  (602)-759-1245           Fax  (602) 7597-8331

       Research articles available at www.thedr.com 

 

 

Cyrex Labs,i

 

Mediumsttested: Saliva

 

       Sensitive GliadiniSalivaiScreener 

Antibody Array 1

Available from your practitioner

or  $150 from www.thedr.com

IgA    

x

       

x

         
IgE                          
IgG                          
IgM    

x

       

x

         

 

 

                           NEW! Gluten Sensitivity Screen Array 1 - Saliva Home Collection Test

                                                       

                                                                        Secretory IgA

                                                        Tests deamidated gliadin - IgA, IgM,

                                                                                       tTG - IgA, IgM

                                                                        

                                                       Price:  $150.00 if ordered from www.thedr.com  

                                                       Patients may order test with script here

 

 

Many patients start with the economical, and fairly sensitive saliva screener, Array 1, first.  If the patient makes these particular antibodies, this test is claimed to have a 96% sensitivity to find them. This means out of 100 samples it will accurately pick up 96 of them if they are present in the sample. 

 

If the saliva screener is negative, the patient has the option to order the more comprehensive antibody blood panel, array 3.  Or they may order both panels to begin with to "cover the most possible bases" since the two tests check mostly different antibodies in different mediums.

 

NOTE: While the saliva test is quite sensitive for the antibodies it checks, it will be negative if patient has different gluten related antibodies besides the ones this saliva test checks.  Furthermore, research indicates that tTG is not elevated in all cases of the gluten syndrome.  Research shows that tTG is only consistently elevated in cases of severe tissue damage to intestinal villi damage.  Note that elevated tTG does not appear in the gluten intolerance diagram on the Medical Diagrams page and The Immunology of Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity to Gluten article Full text here

 

 

 

 

     

  Cyrex Labs

  Medium tested:

  Blood

Intestinal Antigenic

Permeability Screen -

Antibody

Array 2

Available from your practitioner or $230 from www.thedr.com

     
  IgA         x     x
  IgG     x     x     x
  IgM       x     x

 

                                                    NEW!  Intestinal Antigenic Permeability Screen
                                                                     

                                                                      Actomyosin - IgG,
                                                               Occludin/Zonulin - IgA, IgG, IgM
                                                 Lipopolysaccharides
i(LPS) - IgA, IgG, IgM

This screener checks the permeability of the intestinal wall.  This test looks for sufficient gut damage that molecules large enough to set off the immune system can cross the gut wall.

 

 

 

Cyrex Labs,i

 

Mediumsttested: Bloodi

 

 Wheat/GluteniProteome Sensitivity

and Autoimmunity - Antibody Array 3

 

Available from your practitioner

or $360 from www.thedr.com

 

IgA x x x x x x x x x x x x
IgE                        
IgG x x x x x x x x x x x x
IgM                        

GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8

                       

 

The gluten antibodies in this recommended blood panel are the most

complete list offered for tests developed and available at this time. 

 

IgM antibodies for these same peptides may be added at a later date. 

IgM Antibodies may be necessary to check if "Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase" (AID),

an enzyme, is not functioning properly.

(Note: the saliva screener, Array 1, below, checks 2 IgM antibodies.)

 

NEW! This array checks the following antibodies as shown in the chart above

 

Glutenin (Gluten) -  IgA and IgG

 Gluteomorphins  -  IgA and IgG

Alpha Gliadin 17 MER  -  IgA and IgG

Alpha Gliadin33 MER  -  IgA and IgG

Gamma Gliadin 15 MER  -  IgA and IgG

Omega Gliadin  -  IgA and IgG

Gliadin-Transglutaminase  -  IgA and IgG

tTG - Tissue Transglutaminase  -  IgA and IgG

Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase  -  IgA and IgG

Prodynorphin  -  IgA and IgG

Wheat  -  IgA and IgG

Wheat Germ Agglutinin  -  IgA and IgG

 

 

 

Gluten Associated Sensitivity and Cross Reactive Foods

Antibody Array 4

IgA and IgG Combined

 Order through your practitioner or $260 from  www.thedr.com

Cow's Milk

x

Alpha Casein and Beta Casein

x

Casomorphins

x

Milk Butyrophilins

x

American Cheese

x

Chocolate

x

Sesame

x

Hemp

x

Rye

x

Barley

x

Polish Wheat

x

Buckwheat

x

Sorghum

x

Millet

x

Spelt

x

Amaranth

x

Quinoa

x

Yeast

x

Tapioca

x

Oats

x

Coffee

x

Corn

x

Rice

x

Potato

x

 

This panel checks: Foods that most often cross react with gluten

                                   Food most often used as gluten free substitutes.

 

 

~~

 

 

These are the most comprehensive Gluten Syndrome

and Cross Reactive/Substitute Foods Panels available

 

Coming:  Predictive antibody tissue damage tests

to find targeted areas of autoimmune damage.

 

A gluten (or other food) containing diet is required for the any of the food antibody tests.

 

 Dr. Script required. 

See www.thedr.com if you do not have a practitioner to write the script and interpret the results.

 

                                               

 

         

                            

  • In Celiac Disease, A Subset of Autoantibodies against Transglutaminase Binds Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Induces Activation of Monocytes  Published Sept 19, 2006                 Giovanna Zonomi1, Niccardo Navone2, Claudio Lunardi2, Giuseppe Tidente1, Carerina Bason2, Simona Sivori3, Buggero Beri2 Marzia Dolcino4, Enrico Valletta5, Roberto Corrocher2, Antonio Puccetti3,4  Click for abstract and full text

                  1. Section of Immunology, Department of Pathology, Universtiy of Verona, Verona, Italy,

2. Section of Internal Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy

3. Section of Histology, Departmant of Experimental Medicine, University of Genova, Genova, Italy

4. Immunology Unit, Institute G. Gaslini, Genova, Italy,

5. Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy

  • NEW! The Immunology of Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity to Gluten  - European Journal of Inflammation Vol 6 No. 1 1-10 (2008) Editorial - A. Vojdani Beverly Hills, CA

              (now Los Angeles, CA) T. O'Bryan, Warrenville, IL,( now Chicago, Il), G. H. Kellermann Neuroscience, WI, USA Full text here  Note: This file contains 2 articles from the  journjournal.  Scroll to the top to find the Vojdani article

  • NEW! The Immunology of Gluten Sensitivity Beyond the Intestinal Tract - European Journal of Inflammation Vol 6 No 2, 0-0 (2008) Aristo Vojdani, PH.D, M.T., Thomas O'Bryan, D.C.  D.C., CCN, DACBN   Full text here

  • NEW!   The Gluten Response in Children with Celiac Disease is Directed toward Multiple Gliadin and Glutenin Peptides - Willemijen Vader, Yvonne Kooy, Peter Van Veelen,

                Arnoud de Ru, Diana Harris, Willemien Benckhuijsen, Salvador Pena, Luisa Mearin, Jan Wouter Drijfhout, and Frits Koning  Departments of Immunohematology and

                Blood Transfusion and Paediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands; and the Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

                Gastroenterology 2002; 122:1729-1737  Full text here

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe, based on published research -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.  Published research shows tTG is only consistently elevated in cases of very severe tissue damage to intestinal villi.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

Kimball Genetics

101 University Blvd., Suite 350, Denver, CO   80206

Tel. (800)-320-1807  (303)-320-1807  Fax (303)-388-9220

Hours 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM  M-F

KimballiGenetics

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:iBlood oriCheekiswab

IgA x x     x      
IgD                
IgE                
IgG x              
IgM                
TotalIIgA             x  
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8 (seeinoteibelow)               x
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                   

 

This is a genetics lab that also offers a celiac gene test

and a short non comprehensive gluten antibody panel.

 

                                                      Celiac Disease DNA (gene) test - $395 (cash $355.50) Additional family members $316.00

   Celiac Disease Antibody Panel  Celiac Disease DNA and Antibody Panel

                                                              

                                                                               Reports positive/negative meaning "yes" or "no" for HLA DQ 2/8

            Full  HLA - DQ2/8 genotype (specific alleles) available upon request by patient's physician

                                                                                Kimball Genetics counselors are very informative and helpful.

 

* Gene test is a 2 part test, meaning the alpha and beta portions are performed.  This means it is more detailed for the HLA DQ 2 gene for a few patients.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

This panel is unfinished

Mayo Clinic

Mayoiclinic

Mediumttested:

Genettest:i

IgA                                                
IgD                                                
IgE                                                
IgG                                                
IgM                                                
TotalIIgA                                                
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                                                
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                                                   
IntestinaliBiopsyi(villi)                                                
IntestinaliMalabsorption                                                
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                                                
Colitisttest((GSipanel alsoirecommended)                                                

                       

 

Maryland, University of - University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research

Medical Director: Dr. Alesio Fasano M.D.     Co Medical Director:  Carlo Catassi  M.P.H. 

Director: Pamela King      Dietitian:  Pamela Cureton

20 Penn Street,  Room S303B,  Baltimore, Maryland   21201

Celiac Appointment Line  (410)-328-6749   (800)-492-5538

www.celiaccenter.org

UniversityiofiMaryland

SchooliofiMedicine

Centerifor CeliaciResearch recommended paneliforiCeliaci Disease

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:i

IgA x       x            
IgD                      
IgE                      
IgG x                    
IgM                      
TotalIIgA             x        
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8               x      
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                         
IntestinaliBiopsyi(villi)                 x    
IntestinaliMalabsorption                      
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                     x
                       

 

This is a short, non comprehensive antibody panel.

 

                                 Celiac Disease Panel              Gene test                Intestinal duodenal biopsy             Skin Biopsy

 

 This is a "villi damaged celiac disease" panel, recommended by University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research.   This is not a commercial lab.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way,  Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-3570

Tel:  (800) 891-5389  Fax:  (703) 738-4929

email:  nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov    

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#10

NationaliDigestive

DiseasesiInformation

Clearinghouse

recommendediCeliac

DiseaseiPanel

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:i

IgA   x     x            
IgD                      
IgE                      
IgG                      
IgM                      
TotalIIgA             x        
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                      
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                         
IntestinaliBiopsyi(villi)                 x    
IntestinaliMalabsorption                      
SkiniBiopsyiforiDH                     x
Colitisttest((GSipanelialso recommended)                      

 

This panel focuses on villi (celiac) damage only.

 

  Celiac Disease Panel              Gene test                Intestinal duodenal biopsy             Skin Biopsy

 

This is a panel recommended specifically for "villi damaged celiac disease" by NDDIC.  NDDIC is not a lab.

 

The NDDIC website does not address the genetics of gluten reactivity.   The NDDIC is a service of

the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).  The NIDDK is a part of the National

Institutes of Health (NIH) under the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

Optimum Health Resource Laboratories (formerly York Nutritional Laboratories)

2900 North 29th Avenue, Suite #205, Hollywood, Fla, 33020 USA

Toll free Tel:  (888) 751-3388   Local (954) 920-3728   Fax:  (954) 920-3729

www.optimumhealthresource.com   info@optimumhealthresource.com

OptimumiHealth Resourcesi Laboratories

FormerlyiYorki Nutritional

Laboratories

Mediumttested: Bloodi(fingeristick)

Genettest:i

IgA x     x            
IgD                    
IgE                    
IgG x x   x x          
IgM       x            
TotalIIgA                    

SalivaiSecretoryiIgA

x             x x x
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8                    

     

This lab offers tests for gliadin, wheat AND gluten.  Most labs do not check gluten.

 

 cdSCAN Celiac Disease  and  Gliadin Intolerance  

                 Screening Profile 

                 Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) - IgA,   IgG,  IgM  

                 Autoantibody Gliadin - IgA

                 Rapid Test Kit $99

  

This test checks gliadin (wheat), not gluten

Results available in the home or Dr.'s office in approximately 10 minutes.

 

 

 

    saSCAN  Secretory  IgA  Food  Intolerance  Test

           includes egg, gliadin, milk, and soy-$149

            Specimen is mailed to lab for processing

               This test checks gliadin (wheat), not gluten

            Specimen is mailed to lab for processing

 

    IgG  ELISA Food Intolerance Test

           (96-food panel) $379

This panel tests both gluten AND gliadin (wheat) and 9 other grains in one place in the immune system (IgG).

Specimen is mailed to lab for processing

         

Optimum Research Lab tests all four IgG subsets - IgG-1, IgG-2, IgG-3, IgG-4

Helpful information about Optimum Resource Laboratories' Elisa tests

Validation related research is posted on the website.  No dr. script required.  These are finger stick home tests.  Results shipped to patients with

guidebook and 1 year of unlimited telephone and email support.

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

Prometheus Laboratories

9410 Carroll Park Drive, San Diego, CA   92121

Tel: (888) 423-5227     (858) 824-0895    Fax:  (858) 824-0896

www.prometheuslabs.com           

Prometheus Laboratories

Mediumttested: Blood

Genettest:Blood

IgA x x     x    
IgD              
IgE              
IgG x            
IgM              
TotalIIgA           x  
GeneiHLAiDQi2,,8             x
DetermineiwhichiHLAiDQ                 

 

This is a short, non comprehensive antibody panel.

 

                          Celiac Disease Panel $290      tTG-IgA Screener only - $45      PRO-Genologix Celiac Genetics* testing $509

                        Individual tests available as follows:    AGA - IgA or IgG $35     Total IgA $25.00     EMA $150                   

 

Dr. script required. Will send transport kit to doctor or patient, no doctor account required. 

35% discount for

                cash (30 day) payment.  Results sent to doctor.

 

* Gene test is a 2 part test, meaning the alpha and beta portions are both run.  This gives more detail regarding the HLA DQ 2 gene. 

If the test is positive for HLA DQ 2 or 8 it reports the specific alleles.  If negative for HLA DQ 2 or 8 it reports "yes" or "no" .

 

There are two major perspectives on the gluten syndrome vs. celiac disease that involve how to test and interpret tests.

 

Gluten Syndrome focused researchers believe -

  • antibodies are conclusive proof of immune reaction to gluten and indicate need for the gluten free diet.  They do NOT recommend villi biopsy unless there are other reasons to examine the gut.  They use other comprehensive blood test panels to find multiple tissue and function damage instead of focusing on only one tissue, (villi).

  • there are many gluten related peptides, such as gluteomorphins (also called glidorphins or gliadomorphins) and gluten related antibodies, which may show up in any of several areas of the immune system, IgA, IgG, or IgM, or in any of several mediums, such as  blood, saliva or stool, or urine in the case of gluteomorphin peptides.  They test as many antibodies as necessary to find the particular antibodies a patient may produce, with much higher rates of positivity than short panels yield.  However, in the end they consider even the most complete negative test panel necessarily inconclusive since there are known peptides/antibodies for which there are no tests at this time (this is uncommon).

  • gluten syndrome patients may have autoimmune damage in any of many possible body areas instead of or as well as villi damage. Therefore they do NOT use the tTG test to screen for reactivity to gluten since it is specific to one area of damage only, the intestinal villi.

  • Dr Vojdani, Immunosciences Laboratories, believes elevated tTG is sometimes but not always present in a gluten related autoimmune reaction.  Therefore he believes it should be included in test panels but not used as a screener.

 

 

Celiac (villi damage focused)  specialists believe -

  • ONLY intestinal villi or skin damage proved by biopsy are "gold standard" indicators of autoimmune gluten damage and treatment with gluten free diet.  If gluten related antibodies are present and not villi or skin damage the antibodies are disregarded as irrelevant or false positive.

  • tTg - IgA alone is an inexpensive screener to identify patients who should be biopsied for villi damage since it is largely specific to villi damage. 

 

 

 

Disclaimer                         Text Ó2006 - Gluten Sensitivity